Hey, I really enjoyed this piece, but I also enjoyed reading the original book Grit by Duckworth.

Maybe it’s just semantics and splitting hairs, or maybe I’m just ignorantly not understanding what’s being said, because this isn’t how I…

Hey, I really enjoyed this piece, but I also enjoyed reading the original book Grit by Duckworth.

Maybe it’s just semantics and splitting hairs, or maybe I’m just ignorantly not understanding what’s being said, because this isn’t how I view grit at all.

Grit is getting through the difficult parts you don’t enjoy, of the things you do enjoy, in order to get better at them.

Applying this principle to the realm of education is tricky because a lot of teachers don’t understand how to make curriculum enjoyable in the first place.

Good teachers throughout my schooling years have always encouraged individualistic pursuits.

I’ve been able to hand in projects that barely resembled what was supposed to be handed in because there was a confidence that I would learn through passion more so than rote routine. And those are my fondest memories of school.

I digress, though — eventually we are always going to be faced with work we don’t want to do. I think it’s vital that school teaches us the best way of dealing with that kind of work. Kids are honestly being coddled too much, evidenced by grade inflation.

We need to better understand the unfairness of life earlier than we’re currently being taught, and that means pushing students to honestly work harder. I think this can be well ingrained with the message of telling them they need to work for themselves and what they enjoy, as opposed to the narrative that they’re merely cogs in a machine.

Thanks again!